BioExercise: Strengthen your Body. Sharpen your Mind.

BioExercise: Strengthen your Body. Sharpen your Mind.

BioExercise BioExercise is a new exercise program that combines activities for the body and mind to improve total body functionality.  It helps participants address the physical and mental needs of their bodies as they age.  The result: improved physical and cognitive health. Accelerated Aging Advancing technology and urbanization has created millions of desk jobs and long commutes, entailing longer hours sitting. Although technology makes things easier, the results are causing people to think and move less. In fact, the ease of technology has enabled us to become so “connected” that we have actually become dangerously “disconnected” from our minds and bodies.   Aging Gracefully With age you expect physical changes to vision, hearing and muscle tone. But, thankfully an active lifestyle can help slow physical changes and improve muscle strength, bone density and balance (even at an older age). Did you know … the brain, like the rest of the body needs to be worked? Just like physical exercise is designed to strengthen the heart and muscles, use of mental exercises helps maintain a fit and flexible mind. How does BioExercise Work? Purposeful physical exercise All exercises are based on principles of Applied Functional Science (AFS) Every session targets 10 pillars for total body functionality Moving in 6 directions delivers better and faster results Brain boosting techniques stimulates new thinking, problem solving, and other cerebral functions: Mirroring: Reflecting movement of another individual Social interaction: Acting and reacting between two or more individuals Repetition with variation: Performance of a familiar exercise in different ways Problem solving: Use of logic, interpretation and abstract thinking Multi-tasking: Handling of more than one task at... read more
5 Water Exercises for Rheumatoid Arthritis

5 Water Exercises for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Water exercises for Rheumatoid Arthritis have tremendous benefits of which I learned first hand from Kendra Jones. I first met Kendra at a convention hosted by the Aquatic Therapy & Rehab Institute. In a single conversation, it was easy to spot her kind and caring personality. I learned that Kendra’s interest in water exercise stemmed from her own diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis commonly referred to as Jr. RA.

First diagnosed at the age of 4 with childhood-onset rheumatoid arthritis, by 26 she had both hips replaced and at 28 was facing surgery on her neck due to excruciating pain from discs fused together (again from the JRA).

Weighing her options and on the advice of a neurosurgeon, Kendra found other ways to manage the pain without surgery. Today she shares with WEOACH followers some of her favorite water exercises for Rheumatoid Arthritis!

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Exercises for Osteoarthritis

Exercises for Osteoarthritis

When you have daily knee pain, it can make doing everything from walking to bending a chore. Read on for exercises that offer knee pain relief. Did you know that water exercise is an effective treatment for the management of knee osteoarthritis and recommended by the Osteoarthritis Research Society International and by the American College of Rheumatology? Flavia Yazigi, PhD and professor at the University of Lisbon has done extensive research in this area and says, “Aerobic, aquatic and resistance exercise have been shown to help interrupt the cycle of pain-physical activity reduction, control knee osteoarthritis symptoms and improve physical fitness.” Findings of her research recommend that an exercise program includes a mix of cardio, lower body strength, flexibility as well as posture, balance and gait training. WECOACH Functional Training Simplified Our program gets to the source of your pain or weakness so you feel good as you exercise and perhaps, more importantly, move and feel better in all of your daily activities. What’s our secret?  It’s simple. Exercises should move the body in all natural directions.  Most exercise programs focus only on front to back.  If you’ve experienced knee pain and sought exercise to help, you’ve probably tried leg extensions, leg curls or squats.  The question is, did they work?  These exercises all have one thing in common – they move the body in a front to back motion. This is a great place to start, but bodies are not one-dimensional, and muscles are not flat, so if you stop here, your training is incomplete.  WECOACH maximizes efficiency by using exercises that move the body in all 6 natural... read more
My Morning Stretching Routine

My Morning Stretching Routine

Get up and go with three easy exercises!  Whether you are at home or traveling my favorite stretch routine can be used to reduce morning stiffness, reverse the effects of prolonged sitting or as a warm-up for any workout  I’d like to invite you to try – pivot, plank and swing. 3 Stretches You Can Do Every Morning Help reduce stiffness and energize the body with this simple morning stretching routine. Each exercise follows an important principle that guides all WECOACH workouts:  Move the body in 6 natural directions.  If you’ve been following along then you already know these are: Forward Backward Right lateral Left lateral Rotate right Rotate left For the first two exercises, start with two hands on the bed (a steady chair or wall works too). Pivot A Pivot can be defined as moving or turning around a fixed point. In this exercise, we are using one foot as our pivot point.  The other leg steps in 6 directions: Forward and backwards Side to side Rotate right and left Coach Tips: Relax the shoulders. Keep a slight bend in both knees at all times Reach the moving leg in a comfortable range Move at a slow and steady pace Placing both hands on the bed stabilizes the upper body and increases the intensity of the stretch felt not only through the legs but up through the core and upper body. Plank The Plank. In a previous blog, 5 Best Exercises for Back Pain, we explored why a moving plank is superior to holding in place. Get ready in a push up position and start moving your hips in the same six... read more
Exercises to Ease Arthritis Pain

Exercises to Ease Arthritis Pain

Simple Exercises to Ease Arthritis Pain Arthritis is typically characterized by joint pain and stiffness.  Did you know that simple exercises can help ease arthritis pain? Arthritis Facts It is estimated that 50 million U.S. adults have doctor-diagnosed arthritis (1/5) 10% of all adults have arthritis-attributable activity limitation Nearly 50% of individuals 65 years or older have arthritis Living with arthritis can be a vicious cycle.  Pain and stress lead to reduced activity, which ultimately results in decreased flexibility and strength.  You can stop this debilitating cycle with regular movement breaks. Regular Movement Breaks are Better Studies suggest that it takes individuals with arthritis 25-320% more energy to walk when compared to those without arthritis.  This extraordinary energy requirement makes it easy to see why long workouts are not the best solution. Did you know as little as 10 minutes of activity is associated with positive change in heart health? Regular movement helps ease arthritis pain. Simple Moves to Ease Arthritis Pain Everyday activities require the right amount of strength and flexibility. If I can teach people one thing about exercise, it would be that each joint needs movement in 6 directions.  It helps get to the source of pain and weakness, solves problems and prevents injury in a huge way. Try pressing against the resistance of the water moving the leg in 6 directions: Front to back (10-15x) Right to left (10-15x) Right and Left Rotation (10-15x) There are numerous ways that you can change this exercise. Try these other options: Slow motion for flexibility and balance Bigger range for flexibility and core strength Round #1 super slow; Round #2 medium speed; Round... read more
Ai Chi for Fibromyalgia, Asthma, Migraines

Ai Chi for Fibromyalgia, Asthma, Migraines

  What is Ai Chi? Ai Chi is a total body relaxation and strengthening technique.  It uses slow broad movements coordinated with deep breathing.  Created by Jun Konno of Japan, this therapeutic technique is based on elements of Qi Gong and T’ai Chi.  Ai Chi is practiced standing in shoulder-depth water. Ai Chi uses the buoyancy and resistance of water. Continuous integrated movements that involve moving the body in multiple directions paired with careful attention to diaphragmatic breathing and a calm state of mind. Ai Chi can assist with the following health conditions: Pain management for fibromyalgia, arthritis, mastectomy and multiple sclerosis. Respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Cardiovascular problems including cardiac rehabilitation. Circulatory disorders such as hypertension and migraine headaches. Metabolic disorders including weight control, diabetes and obesity. Psychological problems such as chronic fatigue syndrome, anxiety and depressive disorders. Musculoskeletal or orthopedic conditions including low back pain, scoliosis, carpal tunnel syndrome (or any repetitive stress syndrome), musculoskeletal injuries and surgeries, balance deficits, prenatal, sports injuries, and accident and fall prevention. Neurological disturbances including strokes and traumatic brain injury. Endrocinological disorders such as immunodeficiency disorders and fatigue. Ruth Sova, author of “Ai Chi- Balance, Harmony and Healing” says: “Clients with fibromyalgia syndrome are perfect candidates for the Ai Chi program.  They need to rid themselves of anxiety and stress.  Their sympathetic systems appear to be engaged all the time, and they need to balance it with the parasympathetic system.  Heat isn’t a problem with these clients, but fatigue is, and heat could accelerate fatigue.  Lessen the likelihood of fatigue by keeping the pace very slow... read more