Interval Pool Workouts: Tabata and more

Interval Pool Workouts: Tabata and more

Interval Pool Workouts: Tabata, Little Method, Turbulence Training and Fartlek   Various forms of interval workouts have saturated the fitness market.  On land, this type of training is reserved for advanced exercisers. In water, this type of training is realistic and attainable for everyone. Along with my colleague Lori Sherlock, an ironman athlete and an exercise physiologist, I’ve developed an aquatic interval pool workout called HIYO. High intensity (HI) and Yoga (YO) are used to deliver a one of a kind exercise experience. What the Research Says  27 minutes of high intensity interval training 3 times a week has the same cardio benefits as doing 60 minutes of steady state training 5 times a week. Just 2 ½ minutes of sprint intervals can burn an extra 200 calories throughout your day. Intervals ranging from 10 seconds to 4 minutes at intensities ≥70% of maximal aerobic capacity have been shown to be safe and effective in clinical populations. Pleasure and enjoyment are higher during shorter interval trials than during a longer interval or heavy continuous exercise.   HIYO Interval Pool Workouts The HIYO format can help people of all ages reach their health and fitness goals. What makes HIYO different from other interval pool workouts? 6 Directional Movement – HIYO workouts use exercises that move the body in ways that are natural. Based on principles of Applied Functional Science, the WECOACH 6 directional movement formula prepares the body for new or unexpected experiences. Conditioning, rehabilitation and injury prevention. HIYO exercises help you do more of the activities you enjoy most. Personalized Progression – HIYO targets all components of fitness – cardio, flexibility,... read more
Interval Training: Water Workouts for Seniors

Interval Training: Water Workouts for Seniors

Older, Faster and Stronger Older is not usually associated with being faster or stronger. But maybe it could if one believed it to be? Take Usain Bolt, the greatest sprinter of all time, who at 30 years old became the only person to ever win three Olympic 100m gold medals. Or 42 year old Satchel Paige, the oldest major league rookie, and some would argue the best pitcher in baseball. Both of these athletes are examples of older, faster and stronger. And both of these men embody the belief that they can succeed in the physical arena competing against others ten to fifteen years younger. Being successful is more than just a physical ability. It requires a winning mindset to elevate the body to victory. HIYO Interval Training Next time you lead a water exercise class, how can you plan for both a mental and physical workout for your students?  The trick for older participants is to keep the intensity of their program up while considering chronic pain or a prior surgery.  HIYO is a highly adaptable, aquatic exercise program that uses high intensity intervals (HI) with yoga-inspired movements (YO) for recovery. It’s the perfect program proven to improve physical fitness fostered by a winning mindset. High Intensity (HI) Let’s start with the HI part of the HIYO, which is the High Intensity Interval Training part. HIIT has been proven to: Be almost twice as effective at improving heart and vessel health in individuals diagnosed with cardiovascular disease over their younger and healthier counterparts. Increase power and strength, important for things like rising out of a chair and lifting... read more
Fat Burning Water Workout: HI-YO Intervals

Fat Burning Water Workout: HI-YO Intervals

The Best Fat Burning Workout One of the most commonly asked questions to aquatic fitness professionals is, “what is the best fat burning workout?” Although there is no “best way”, the bottom line is the more calories that are burned, the greater the potential for fat loss.  There are many ways to design a weight loss workout. For example: (1) Exercises performed for longer duration at a lower intensity and (2) Exercises for a shorter duration at higher intensity can yield the same fat-burning outcomes. On land a high intensity workout may be reserved for advanced exercisers.  However, water serves as the great equalizer making high intensity interval training appropriate for all! Water … the Great Equalizer! For example, say you weigh 200 pounds and you walk on a treadmill for 1 mile at a pace of 4 miles per hour.  A 15 minute workout would expend approximately 113 calories.  You could reduce exercise time and burn more calories by running at a 6 mile per hour pace burning 151 calories in just 10 minutes.  Or perhaps you would rather try intermixing short sprints into your treadmill walking program. This integration of high intensity bursts increases fat burning capabilities resulting in a higher number of calories burned. However, running on a treadmill may not feel good on your joints.  Water offers a joint friendly fat burning workout alternative! Aquatic exercise has many benefits.  In addition to being a great fat-busting workout, it takes the stress off of joints, promotes the use of more muscles, and provides an opportunity to mix up your workout routine. Did you know?  Water aerobics for an hour can result in an average of 400-500 calories... read more
Exercise Tips for a Healthy Heart

Exercise Tips for a Healthy Heart

Water Aerobics for Weight Loss Muscle of the Month: The Heart You might be thinking the heart is an organ not a muscle!  An organ is defined as “a part of an organism that is typically self-contained and has a specific vital function.”  A muscle is defined as “a bundle of fibrous tissues in a human or animal body with the ability to contract.”  Your heart meets both of these qualifiers and is one of the most important organs in the body as it continuously contracts to pump blood around your body to deliver oxygen and nutrients as well as remove waste. How Many Times Does Your Heart Beat? If you use an average of 80 beats per minute, your heart beats about 4,800 times per hour. That’s a whopping 115,200 times per day. Over the course of a year, your heart would beat about 42,048,000 times! If you live to be 80 years old, your heart would have beaten approximately 3,363,840,000 times! That’s over 3 billion heartbeats! What a muscle! Exercise Tips for a Healthy Heart The American Heart Association says, “physical activity is anything that makes you move your body and burn calories.” This includes walking, biking, swimming, playing sports or climbing stairs.  For overall cardiovascular health, the AHA Recommends: At least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity at least 5 days a week or At least 25 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity at least 3 days a week, and Moderate to high-intensity muscle-strengthening activity at least 2 days a week For lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, it is recommended to do an average of 40 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity aerobic activity at least... read more
HI-YO: Interval Training for ALL

HI-YO: Interval Training for ALL

By Laurie Denomme, BS, & Lori Sherlock, EdD Benefits of High Intensity Interval Training From Tabata to Timmons, everyone has their own take on how to deliver high intensity interval workouts. There is a simple explanation as to why so many programs involve HIIT…it works!  On land, this type of training is reserved for advanced exercisers.  However, in water, the ability to go beyond limits thought possible is realistic, attainable and repeatedly done by widespread populations. HI-YO Aquatic Interval Training System HI-YO is a highly adaptable, research-based aquatic exercise program that uses high intensity intervals (HI) with yoga-inspired movements (YO) to create a fun and effective workout. The paring of HI and YO allows for maximal caloric expenditure during and after the workout. In addition to the opportunity for massive caloric burn, all aspects of fitness can be improved with participation. The primary goals of this workout is to: Build self-confidence Improve cardiovascular function Increase functional abilities Achieve weight loss goals Increase daily activity How HI-YO Helps Improve Fitness Cardiovascular Endurance:  HIIT is often not the first form of training we think of for strengthening our cardiovascular system, but maybe it should be.  Research has indicated that HIIT is not only effective for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the cardiovascular system, but it actually provides more physiological benefits than continuous training.  (In fact, a study by Gibala et al. showed that accumulating 2.5 hours of HIIT resulted in similar endurance gains as 10.5 hours of accumulated continuous endurance training.) Muscular Strength:  One of the primary reasons that HIIT was invented was to help strength-focused athletes maintain and build... read more