Exercise Guidelines for Chronic Pain

Exercise Guidelines for Chronic Pain

Exercise Guidelines for Chronic Pain Dr. Grant Burrows, Osteopath and Fellow of Applied Functional Science sheds an enlightening perspective on pain. He explains that most pain is associated with tissue damage.  The spinal cord acts as a transmitter to convey information from the tissues to the brain.  Things such as inflammation and other “noise” can quickly overtake the competing information conveyed by our proprioceptors – the body’s system that detects and interprets movement.  In the case of chronic pain, the brain starts to hear more noise and less proprioception, creating a disconnect between the brain and tissues.   Burrows describes it like this:  “Think of the noise requiring square receptors and the proprioceptors requiring circles. By moving the body in ways that the body does not associate pain, that are highly variable and fun, you can disrupt the pain cycle as you create a greater need for circle receptors and lesser need for squares.” Whether you are searching for ways to reduce arthritis, low-back, or a nagging knee pain or hip pain.  Or perhaps looking for better ways to effectively manage fibromyalgia or multiple sclerosis pain.  There is an answer.  For reasons explained in my previous blog, Benefits of Water Exercise, just being in water is a great start. Next step:  Design better exercise programs. Treat Chronic Pain with Exercise that Follows 3 Guidelines: Move in a range that feels good:  This approach applies if you are exercising on land or in the pool.  It is appropriate for low-impact walking or high intensity intervals.  It’s simple.  Find a range that is comfortable. If a movement hurts, make is smaller or use less impact. Move... read more